Reviews

* * * * 4 out of 5 stars:  “Gay science fiction enthusiasts can expect a treat when they read Baja Clavius. How time travel alters past events is shown by the author revisiting scenes which have different outcomes. This technique is normally associated with great movie directors such as Akira Kurosawa in Rashomon. The reader must be prepared for masculine characters to engage in frank sex; some are not nice to one another.” — Amazon Australia paperback book customer
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Baja Clavius by Madeira Desouza is a science fiction erotica. The story is about a secret organisation named MMDI, at the end of the twenty-third century, which sends men with high cognitive flexibility, to the past. In the past, they attempt to change great disasters by sexually manipulating other men, who somehow are linked with the impending catastrophe and thus in doing so, they prevent the disaster from ever happening in the first place. The story matures through seven hundred pages, where several dark secrets about [MMDI] and their agents are revealed.
 
If you have a problem in reading graphic descriptions of how big muscular men feel pleasure by having sexual intercourse with other men, you should not read this book. In the few hundred pages, the author did not shy away from writing about male sexuality. In fact, it is omnipresent in this book.
 
The time travellers enjoy eternal youth and gain pleasure from having intercourse with other men. The cover of the book seems weird at first, but after reading the story, you will understand that naked men with muscles are the main highlight of this book. The story is good. For one, there is a bit of mystery all around, and as the story progresses, it gets more and more mysterious. The characters fit in the story well, and the ending is decent and makes sense. The story describes the early twenty-first and late twentieth century, so the setting looks familiar and well set. And also, this is a time-travelling agency which uses gay sex to undo disasters, so the author deserves full credit in the creativity department.” — OnlineBookClub.org
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Niche queer fetish escapades collide with clandestine cowboy missions from the moon in Baja Clavius. While this oftentimes violent and sprawling sci-fi thriller is not for everyone, it offers compelling imagery and curious insights into a boundless universe.
 
Baja Clavius is more than out of this world—it evades comparison. Our protagonist Ted Avila is a former military man commissioned to become a top-secret time travel agent on a lunar base nicknamed “Moon Men Deep Inside” located beneath the crater Clavius. His mission is to repair timelines in the past to save humanity by employing his insatiable carnal appetite and penchant for domination.
 
Along the way, the incredibly virile Ted becomes sexually involved with many buff, muscle-bound men on Earth, all in conflicting timelines. Vincent Wauneka—Ted’s oft-partner in both vocation and lust—is typically along for the very bumpy and murderous ride. But it’s not all as easy for Ted as simply following his lascivious instincts. He can remember multiple timelines even after changing them, creating a psychic cacophony peppered with perceived memory loss, flashbacks, experiential repetition, and a colorful array of cognitive dissonance.
 
Where Baja Clavius shines is in its description of the natural world, invoking the Southwest postcard nostalgia of jagged rocks, the neon lights of garish casinos, lonely highways, and the bleak, unforgiving desert. Desouza also offers esoteric and compelling scenes of action. Indeed, the story insists that, like the characters, the reader reluctantly disrupt any expectations of space and time. This makes for a worthwhile examination of action and consequence.
 
It’s important to note Baja Clavius espouses the bara genre, a Japanese underground art form known for sex among adult men. Still, even outside of this community, the rugged, rough-hewn intensity of Desouza’s work bears merit. While this oftentimes violent and sprawling sci-fi thriller is not for everyone, it offers compelling imagery and curious insights into a boundless universe.”– IndieReader.com
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If you’re looking for something really different in sci-fi erotica, there’s nothing quite so unique as the writings of Madeira Desouza. In his latest novella, Desouza takes us on a wild roller coaster ride with a group of moon-based time travelers who embark on a series of missions to change Earth’s past. Building on the memorable characters and plots from his previous successes,  Desouza enhances his unpredictable yet brilliant writing with all-new, original illustrations created just for this volume. The story is a stunner, the artwork is a surprise with the overall effect being lustful, fiery, shocking and hilarious. Politically correct it isn’t but for fans of either genre it’s a journey you won’t want to miss! [Amazon.com review of earlier edition no longer available]

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Time travel is one of the most interesting and rich themes in science-fiction. It offers so many variations for dealing with paradoxes and inconsistencies that arise from changing the past. Madeira Desouza’s gay erotic tale of time-traveling agents raises a question I have never seen posed before: how do time travelers cope with the changes that have been wrought in their home world by their efforts to fix problems in the past. MMDI—which is both the title of the book and a play on the acronym for the agency—suggests the agents will have to be effectively brainwashed upon their return so that they are not traumatized by the consequences of their actions. So then, what if an agent can’t forget?

This book is occasionally delightfully sexy. But the most intriguing parts of the story are the occasional recurrences where events are repeated with slight changes because the protagonist Time Travel Agent goes back and tries to change outcomes. The sexiness is fun, but the time travel is mind-boggling in just the way a good science fiction novel can be entrancing and satisfying. [Amazon.com review of earlier edition no longer available]

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It’s a courageous step. Gay science fiction can be a very hard sell indeed, which is why too little of it is published (that is, gay science fiction as distinct from the oceans of erotica being churned out by the m/m e-presses, most of which is barely recognizable as science fiction, and much more easily identified as erotica with futuristic props and set dressing!)

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This is definitely not your “normal” read. I think that if you are a GLBT Doctor Who or Torchwood fan you might be more inclined to find this an interesting read as I did. It’s been a couple of days since I’ve finished reading it and I’m still processing the story.

This is a huge eBook and it contains all the Madeira Desouza novellas together in one bundle. I’d like to read more of his novels.

Thank you for an interesting read, Madeira Desouza!

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I read Baja Clavius and it really was an exciting ride. I have no other way to describe it but a “ride.” The pace of the book was superb. I would be moving along and then “bam!” the unexpected would happen.

Your ability to weave the multi-timeline plot was impressive. I continuously found myself being surprised by events.

I must admit, the first chapter made me a bit nervous. I thought the book was going to take the direction of straight-up erotica with no real story or depth behind it. Boy was I wrong!

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Also see J. Scott Coatsworth’s 2019 blog post about Baja Clavius.